More Employment Coverage

  • May 31, 2024

    Texas Judge Opts Not To Recuse And Tosses Chamber Suit

    A Texas federal judge has thrown out the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's suit seeking to block the Federal Trade Commission from implementing a ban on noncompete clauses because a different plaintiff was first to file, adding he declined to recuse himself because no companies in his stock portfolio were parties in the case.

  • May 31, 2024

    NJ Judge Says Mortgage Lender's Counterclaim Falls Flat

    A New Jersey federal judge tossed an unfair competition counterclaim brought by Nationwide Mortgage Bankers Inc. in a trade secrets suit by its rival Paramount Residential Mortgage Group, ruling that Nationwide Mortgage's counterclaim allegations do not actually count as unfair competition under Garden State law.

  • May 30, 2024

    UPenn Retools Fight Against Defamation Suit Over Email

    An email addressing how an anthropology professor handled the remains of the 1985 MOVE house bombing victims cannot be considered defamatory because it was rooted in personal perspectives and not facts, the University of Pennsylvania told a federal court Wednesday.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ex-Chicago Mayor Dodges Atty's Lawsuit Over Zoom Tirade

    An Illinois judge tossed a lawsuit brought by a former in-house attorney for the Chicago Park District accusing former Mayor Lori Lightfoot of unleashing a profane tirade laced with crude, insulting and defamatory comments during a Zoom call.

  • May 30, 2024

    Mich. Supreme Court To Hear Town Benefits Breach Case

    The Michigan Supreme Court has said it will consider whether a village was entitled to coverage for damages it incurred in lawsuits from former employees who sued after the village decided to stop providing lifetime healthcare benefits, ordering oral arguments on an insurer's challenge to a state court's ruling.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA Loses Bid To Sink Reggie Bush Defamation Suit

    The NCAA has failed in its bid to get an early toss of the defamation suit filed by 2005 Heisman Trophy winner Reggie Bush, with an Indiana court ruling a dismissal is premature at this point because the former running back has met the pleading standards.

  • May 30, 2024

    'South Park'-Quoting Judge Says CEO Can't 'Blame Canada'

    In a ruling drawing on the show about four foul-mouthed boys from Colorado, a Pennsylvania federal judge said a CEO who sued his former company could not blame Canada for an unfavorable arbitration ruling in a case where he claimed he was wrongly fired from his post.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA V. Athletes Suits Paused As Parties Talk Final Deal

    The consolidated cases in the class action against the NCAA over athletes' name, image and likeness compensation were stayed by a California federal judge Thursday, the next step toward finalizing the multibillion-dollar settlement the two sides reached last week.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA To End Transfer Rules In Deal With DOJ

    The NCAA agreed on Thursday to stop enforcing all rules governing athletes transferring from one institution to another, as part of a proposed consent decree filed by the U.S. Department of Justice to settle an antitrust suit against the organization by 10 states and the District of Columbia.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ex-WWE Worker Pauses Trafficking Claims For DOJ Probe

    A former World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. paralegal has agreed to put her sexual assault and trafficking lawsuit against the company, founder Vince McMahon and a former executive on hold while the U.S. Department of Justice conducts a "nonpublic investigation," the plaintiff's counsel said Thursday.

  • May 29, 2024

    NC State Is Blocking Probe Of PCBs In Building, Court Told

    North Carolina State University is trying to exploit the judicial process in order to destroy evidence of building contamination, a cancer-stricken professor told a state appeals court Tuesday in a bid to advance plans for a carcinogen inspection.

  • May 29, 2024

    Teacher's Contract Renewal Claim Spiked By Ga. Justices

    The Supreme Court of Georgia ruled Wednesday that a teacher can't sue his former district for denying him a contract renewal after he missed its due date, finding that the lack of a definitive salary figure in the offer doesn't conflict with state law.

  • May 29, 2024

    NCAA Must Face Bulk Of Student-Athlete's W.Va. Transfer Suit

    A West Virginia federal judge will not allow the NCAA to escape the bulk of an antitrust lawsuit filed by a 22-year-old, ruling he sufficiently supported his claims accusing the organization of contract interference when it deemed him ineligible to play basketball after a midseason transfer. 

  • May 29, 2024

    DOJ Requests More Info On $2.2B Employee Screening Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice has requested more information about employment screening company First Advantage Corp.'s planned $2.2 billion purchase of rival Sterling Check Corp., extending the review period for the merger.

  • May 29, 2024

    Chancery Pins Down Musk, Tesla On Pay Bid, Del. Jurisdiction

    Delaware's chancellor has nailed Elon Musk, Tesla Inc. and their counsel to assurances that the company won't flee state corporate law jurisdiction and a potentially massive stockholder attorney fee dispute by rushing votes on a struck-down, $56 billion compensation plan for Musk and proposed reincorporation in Texas.

  • May 29, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Jackson Lewis Litigator In Orlando

    Jackson Lewis PC's former Orlando litigation manager has joined Greenberg Traurig LLP as a labor and employment shareholder.

  • May 28, 2024

    The NCAA Put Out One Fire, But The House Is Still Ablaze

    Despite the enormous size of the settlement of a class action by hundreds of thousands of former college athletes over name, image and likeness compensation denied to them, experts say it only resolves one of the NCAA's many legal crises, while shining a light on the severity of the others.

  • May 28, 2024

    Mich. Judge Tosses Ex-Prosecutor's Suit Over Firing

    A Michigan federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit from a fired assistant prosecutor alleging he lost his job at the Macomb County Prosecutor's Office for speaking out about harassment and retaliation, after the county asked for sanctions because the plaintiff wasn't complying with discovery requirements and missed a deposition.

  • May 28, 2024

    Lin Wood Wants Fraud Claims Kept Out Of Defamation Trial

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood has asked a Georgia federal judge to bar his former law partners, who allege he falsely accused them of attempted extortion, from introducing evidence at an upcoming August trial related to two separate and still pending suits filed against him in Fulton County.

  • May 24, 2024

    Airline Worker Terrorized 'Countless' Passengers, Suit Says

    A California man with ties to American Airlines gained access to the private information of regional airline passengers and embarked on a monthslong campaign of harassing them, according to a lawsuit in federal court with 15 plaintiffs.

  • May 24, 2024

    Food Supplier Says Exec Raided Files, Jumped to Competitor

    A senior sales executive at a Massachusetts food distributor spent his final days with the company slipping in after hours and on weekends to print out and photocopy customer records and other trade secrets, before jumping to a direct competitor, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs US Immunity Over Marine Recruit's Death

    The Third Circuit has said that "tragedy does not trump sovereign immunity" in a precedential ruling finding that the federal government is immune from a wrongful death suit brought by a U.S. Marine Corps recruit's family after he crashed his car and died on the way to an event for the corps.

  • May 24, 2024

    Nixon Peabody Adds Littler Duo As OSHA Practice Chairs

    Nixon Peabody LLP has brought on a pair of Littler Mendelson PC attorneys who previously worked in California's Occupational Safety & Health division as practice co-chairs.

  • May 24, 2024

    DraftKings' Noncompete Win Shuns Calif. Law, 1st Circ. Told

    A former DraftKings Inc. executive who was blocked from taking a job in Los Angeles at rival sportsbook Fanatics told the First Circuit that a Massachusetts federal judge should have applied a worker-friendly California law to the trade secrets spat.

  • May 24, 2024

    McElroy Deutsch Seeks Win Against Ex-CFO After Guilty Plea

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP is urging a New Jersey state court to order its former chief financial officer to pay roughly $1.5 million damages for "unauthorized compensation" he paid himself and force him to disgorge $5.4 million in pay he received from the firm.

Expert Analysis

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

    Author Photo

    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Compliance Strategies To Mitigate 3 New Areas Of AI Risk

    Author Photo

    The era of artificial intelligence-assisted corporate crime is here, but several concrete mitigation strategies can allow companies to address the new, rapidly evolving threats posed by deepfakes, information barrier evasion and AI model manipulation, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • The FTC's Noncompete Rule Is Likely Dead On Arrival

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's April 23 noncompete ban ignores the consequences to the employees it claims to help — but the rule is unlikely to go into effect provided the ideological makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court remains the same, say Erik Weibust and Stuart Gerson at Epstein Becker.

  • McKesson May Change How AKS-Based FCA Claims Are Pled

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s analysis in U.S. v. McKesson, an Anti-Kickback Statute-based False Claims Act case, provides guidance for both relators and defendants parsing scienter-related allegations, say Li Yu at Dicello Levitt, Ellen London at London & Stout, and Erica Hitchings at Whistleblower Law.

  • Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Teach Your Party Representative The Art Of Nonverbal Cues

    Author Photo

    As illustrated by recent reports about President Donald Trump’s nonverbal communication in court, jurors notice what’s happening at counsel table, which may color their perceptions of the case as a whole, so trial attorneys should teach party representatives to self-monitor their nonverbal behaviors, says Clint Townson at Townson Consulting.

  • FTC Noncompete Ban Signals Rising Labor Focus In Antitrust

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission’s approval this week of a prohibition on noncompete agreements continues antitrust enforcers’ increasing focus on labor, meaning companies must keep employee issues top of mind both in the ordinary course of business and when pursuing transactions, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • 4 Ways To Refresh Your Law Firm's Marketing Strategy

    Author Photo

    With many BigLaw firms relying on an increasingly obsolete marketing approach that prioritizes stiff professionalism over authentic connection, adopting a few key communications strategies to better connect with today's clients and prospects can make all the difference, say Eric Pacifici and Kevin Henderson at SMB Law.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

    Author Photo

    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

    Author Photo

    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

    Author Photo

    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

    Author Photo

    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Other archive.